RISK: Canada isn’t well-equipped to fight cyber crime

Unlike Australia and the U.S., most Canadian cybersecurity reporting and resolution occurs in the private sector

Canada’s cybersecurity strategy ignores phishing scams, online extortion and corporate breaches, CBC reports. There are also no federal laws to disclose hacks, and Canada doesn’t have a central agency to track cyber attacks.

“People having their identity threatened, or having their computers infected, files locked down for ransom, those types of things, the average police station doesn’t know how to respond to that,” Norm Taylor, who leads an executive training program for the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, told the CBC.

Read: How hackers hack

Unlike Australia and the U.S., both of which have national programs to monitor cyber crime trends and thwart criminal groups, most Canadian cybersecurity reporting and resolution occurs in the private sector.

“So if my credit card is compromised, I’m going to call my bank,” says Taylor. “My bank is going to take the report, they are going to resolve the issue, and they are going to reimburse me. At no point does the criminal justice system even know that this happened. Whereas now in Australia, you can’t get the bank to reimburse you unless you have an [Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network] filing number.”

Read more.

Copyright © 2017 Transcontinental Media G.P.
Transcontinental Media G.P.